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Designing coherent instruction artifacts

Boyd, M. 95, No. designing student assessments What is it: Component 1F of the Danielson Framework discusses the importance of assessments, both formative and summative, for student learning. 2. Concept Map – Advanced Organizer. Assessing Student Learning coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives. Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport b. Category I reviews: Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy, Knowledge of Pennsylvania Academic Standards, Knowledge of Students, Selecting Instructional Goals, Designing Coherent Instruction, Assessing Student Learning, Knowledge of Resources, Materials and Technology. Southern Arkansas University Magnolia, Arkansas . Instructional maps that indicate relationships prior learning. Page 6. Teachers must communicate with their students all day long whether it be for the purposes of teaching them new Designing coherent instruction The seventh InTASC standard—aligned to Domain 1: Planning and Preparation of the Danielson Framework—requires teachers to use their knowledge of the content, curriculum, multiple disciplines, pedagogy, as well as their learners to plan their lessons. Planning Assessment Criteria 3. 1. Using assessment in instruction • 4a. Of course, people's perspectives may differ slightly, because of their different roles. Communication with Students b. Managing Classroom Procedures. The Framework for Teaching, created by Charlotte Danielson, is a comprehensive and coherent framework that 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction. Method of Instruction: List the method of presenting: Classroom video or interactive hands-on activity. The components of Domain 4 demonstrate the behind-the-scenes work associated with teaching. Such planning requires that educators have a clear understanding of the state, dis - EXAMPLES of ARTIFACTS Note: This is a brainstormed list of possible artifacts. of the portfolio, and artifacts are collected from pertinent content courses, education courses  1e – Designing coherent instruction. Managing classroom procedures . Coherence (methods, materials, assessments all work together) 2. Everything should be aligned with state standards and common core. Problem-based learning 4. T. Organizing the physical space . Aligns with Instructional Outcomes 2. Its components are: 2a. Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment Standard I: Curriculum, Planning and Assessment The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through designing coherent instruction and authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing, student performance and growth, and continuously refining learning objectives. Teachers must be aware of all components and variables in the classroom. 3. See Adding an Artifact on eVal. The key is to review the component rubrics as well, as the rubric descriptions and critical attributes provide additional ideas for possible artifacts. Understanding student success informs teachers how to advance in teaching. These are the ‘behind the scenes’ components, typically not observable in a classroom setting. One of the main ways that teachers discover how their students are learning is through designing different assessments. Designing coherent instruction; 1f. OMAIN . Activities that represent high-level thinking. The activities are not designed to engage students in active intellectual activity and e. These include demonstrate knowledge of content and pedagogy, demonstrating knowledge of the students, selecting instructional goals, demonstrating knowledge of resources, designing coherent instruction, and assessing student learning Domain 2: The classroom Environment. 2a Creating an environment of respect and rapport . • Domain 1—1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes, 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction, and 1f: Designing Student Assessments • Domain 3—3a: Communicating with Students, 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques, 3c: Engaging Students in Learning, and 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction d. 1e Designing Coherent Instruction. Organizing Physical Space Domain 4 PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES a. Not a checklist—evidence based and reflective. Artifacts: While artifacts are not required, teachers may wish to collect documentation for domains as proof they are being Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning, reflecting the teacher's knowledge of content and of the  Find sample artifacts and tools organized by grade band on the district's Knowledge Center site: (http://kc. Designing Coherent Instruction--Pre-. Element . An assessment should never be a judge of how much information can be crammed into a student's brain, but instead it should be a reflection of what the student has learned. The Office of Admissions, Field Experience, and Licensure . Observation Worksheet & artifacts presented at Pre- Observation Conference. 18 access to technology) and knows how to plan instruction that is responsive to cultural and socioeconomic differences among students. org The Domains of Professional Practice- The Danielson Framework The Professional Portfolio Domain 1: Planning and Preparation 1a Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy 1b Demonstrating Knowledge of Students 1c Setting Instructional Outcomes 1d Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Designing Coherent Instruction This is the combination of various components. Activities provide opportunity for higher-level Designing coherent instruction What Planning instruction that increase the students' understanding by assessment, outcomes, knowledge of the students, and relating the material to the state standards. Lessons that support instructional outcomes and reflect important concepts. Instructional planning shows a structure and selection of materials and activities that support student learning relative to the district or charter school's curricula. Thoughtfully planned learning groups. All that aside, I feel like GoFormative is a great resource to use in the classroom. e. A balance between careful planning and flexibility in execution. • Learning activities sequenced and connected within the lesson or unit plan. • Designing Coherent Instruction 1f. Based on the work of Charlotte Danielson, 2007 Standard 1: Planning and Preparation Component 1d: Designing Coherent Instruction Teachers translate instructional outcomes into learning experiences for students through the design of instruction. •Assessing may also include artifacts prepared by the teacher By Design. P. Teacher’s performance demonstrates: Designing coherent instruction InTASC Standard 8: Instructional Strategies To demonstrate my proficiency in the area of instructional strategies , I chose to show some writing samples where the students used their creativity and originality to construct a piece about what they would do if they became President. Teachers are often responsible for keeping 1E: Designing Coherent Instruction Instruction is an important part to who we as teachers are, and this Danielson domain completely focuses on instruction. Oct 20, 2014 · Pictured to the left, you will be able to see one of the center examples as students are working on them. Using SolidWorks is rather tedious as there is a lot of features that can be used in different ways to accomplish the same thing. Designing Coherent Instruction: Lesson plans differentiate for individual student needs 1f. Evidence for Domains 2 and 3 will be collected DOMAIN 1: Planning and Preparation Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction Element Suggestions for Improvement Indicators Critical Attributes Examples Artifacts Lesson and Unit Structure Clear and sequenced lesson and unit structures are present. Conference Discussion. Physical educators design progressions that allow students to build on previously learned content and skills by focusing on lifetime 1e Designing Coherent Instruction. • 1e. Teacher & student reflection of lessons, learning, or feedback (written or oral). Designing coherent instruction 1f. ➢ Instructional groups. ➢ Lesson and unit structure. Designing Coherent Instruction. Lesson plans show progression of complexity. Assessments. 1e. Lessons that support instructional outcomes and reflect important concepts . Designing Student Assessment 1. "Our goal," explains Paynter, "is to come up with processes and tools that help educators create coherent reading instruction, so that when a child enters school, there is a reasonable guarantee of success at the end. Problem-based learning. Student feedback surveys on lessons Designing Coherent Instruction: Teacher plans for learning activities that align with the instructional goals and support student learning. 2d . Plan allows for reasonable time allocation with differentiation for individual student needs. Evidence of teaching may be provided either by the teacher or by a mentor, a coach, or a supervisor. Included are artifacts pertaining to my resume which may included, but are not limited too, records or certificates. Designing coherent instruction • 1f. Designing student assessment • 2a. texts, instructional aids, field trips, experts from Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction. Component 1e, designing coherent instruction, involves tying in the outcomes, assessments, materials, activities, pedagogy and standards so that they all align. 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction. Designing Coherent Instruction 1. (2007). Engaging students in learning • 3d. • Instructional materials and resources aid instruction and are appropriate to the learning needs of students. Designing coherent instruction. REPARATION. Designing coherent instruction Communicating with students Using questioning and discussion techniques Engaging students in learning Demonstrating flexibility and responsiveness #3 Planning for Differentiated Instruction The competent teacher plans and designs instruction based on content area knowledge, diverse student characteristics, student Designing Coherent Instruction. The following are examples ONLY and not meant to provide an exhaustive list. The teacher needs to realize that each lesson builds off of each other and goes in that order for a reason. Component 4F is important because professionalism is about trust, honesty, integrity, confidentiality, & advocacy. C. Such planning requires that educators have a clear 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction The series of learning experiences is poorly aligned with the instructional outcomes and does not represent a coherent structure. Part of instruction is connecting state standards, student outcomes, assessments, and teacher knowledge of students together in order to help student understanding. Artifacts should be a sample that demonstrates educator performance and impact. When planning instruction, teachers must be mindful of regulations for learning objectives on all levels. Designing Coherent Instruction • Teachers –the original ‘design thinkers’. sese. Domain II: Classroom Environment. Domain 2: Classroom Environment . Some of the artifacts may be used to demonstrate your competence in more than one domain/standard. Domain 2: Samples of student work, with analysis. E. Designing Coherent www. This companion focuses on two high -leverage domains, which are Planning and Preparation (domain one) and Instruction Welcome to Mrs. We began with specific Common Core State Standards in mind, and then preceded to create a lesson, which involved student manipulation of materials, in an attempt to increase engagement. Domain 1- Planning and Preparation and Domain 4 - Professional Responsibilities are considered “unobservable” domains. Summative Conference: Meet with administrator to review Self-Assessment, and progress on Goals, and Summative Evaluation. - Checklists. - Units of Study. Sample Artifacts for Certified Teachers The collection and presentation of artifacts can help provide information and evidence related to teaching practice. Variety of instructional activities and methods 3. The College of Education and . 1: P. Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction. Such planning requires that educators have a clear understanding of the state, 1e. - Lesson Plans. PLANNING AND PREPARATION 1a Demo  nstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy 1b Demonstrating Knowledge of Students 1c Setting Instructional Outcomes 1d Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Assessments A variety of artifacts highlighting how I have synthesized the above components are Appropriate and coherent instructional design in which plans for all elements are completely aligned with the instructional goals, have a clear sequence, and include adaptations for individual student needs. • Summative Rubric *(Teacher Artifacts are used to provide evidence to the observer that is relevant to the professional. Designing Student Assessments. Course syllabus. A Guide for Student Teaching 2015-16 (Field Experience III) at . F. Possible Artifacts: Putting reflection questions within the lesson plans prior to teaching so that they may be best reviewed. Establishing a Culture for Learning. Artifacts. • Designing Student Assessments. This is a very necessary component of education because teachers must understand why assessment is important and the differences in assessment as to Artifacts should show of diverse resources used in the classroom (print and electronic) Lists of speakers used in your classes Supplemental materials you provide or recommend 1e – Designing coherent instruction Artifacts should demonstrate teachers knowledge of content and pedagogical Framework for Teaching and Learning The following document provides an overview of the Framework for Teaching and Learning developed by Baltimore County Public Schools for the purpose of equipping our graduates to be globally competitive through the delivery of high quality first instruction in every classroom for every child, every day. ✓ Learning activities. 2e . Designing Student Assessment Assessment is a vital component for an effective teacher. Pre- Observation Form. In order to accomplish this, coherent instructional materials must be 1e- Designing Coherent Instruction 1f- Designing Student Assessments Reflection on Domain 2 Reflection on Domain 3 4a- Reflecting on Practice 4b- Maintaining Accurate Records 4c- Communication with Families 4d- Participating in a Professional Community 4e- Growing and Developing Professionally 1e. , video,. 1B Designing Coherent Instruction. Student developed rubric (teacher) tied to specific goals. Component 4F refers to how a teacher conducts themselves in the school, with colleagues, students, and the community. Rather than a written test, students could write a paper, make a video, draw a diagram, or express their understanding in another form. com for the same time and effort. Anchor Standards in Reading: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. This component requires that our outcomes, assessments, materials, activities, teaching methods, and standards align. Formal (see above description) Informal (see above description) 1e - Designing Coherent Instruction This lesson was created jointly with my supervising teacher, for an 8th grade mathematics class. The instructional outcomes, the activities, the materials, the methods, and the grouping of students are aligned. Assessments of learning let the teacher know if the students have learned the intended outcomes, and assessments for learning enable teachers to incorporate assessments directly into the instruction 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Assessments 2. Communicating with Students - Lesson Plans Danielson Framework- Example Artifacts/Elements . Domain 3: Instruction. Instructional ARTIFACTS. Wrap Up - Synthesis/Closure: Differentiation According to Student Needs : (Framework Domain 1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students) Address diverse student needs including students with an IEP or 504, cultural or linguistic needs. Design of Formative Assessments 4. 3a. 1e – Designing coherent instruction *Unit plans that exhibit 1. B. Common Core State Standards. Domain 4: Possible Artifacts and Data Sources This list represents some possible artifacts and is not intended to be used as a check off sheet or thought of as comprehensive,ratherasaresourceanda“brainstorm”ofideas. Teacher has no plans to use assessment results in designing future instruction. A list of additional suggested artifacts may be found on the DOE website and in the Teacher Effectiveness handbook. Curriculum Mapping. Component 1E talks about how our lessons need to enhance our students learning. Organizing Physical Space Domain Three: Instruction a. Activities that represent  The teacher plans learning activities that align with instructional goals and support student learning. The instruction should demonstrate an understanding of the content through tests or assessments. 1e- Designing Coherent Instruction 1f- Designing Student Assessments Reflection on Domain 2 Reflection on Domain 3 4a- Reflecting on Practice 4b- Maintaining Accurate Records 4c- Communication with Families 4d- Participating in a Professional Community 4e- Growing and Developing Professionally It is recommended that evaluators and teachers review these rubrics prior to identifying agreed upon artifacts, as these artifacts will be scored using the rubrics. Managing classroom procedures • 3c. Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction What is it? Teachers must manage the learning process through combining knowledge of the content, knowledge of the students, clarity of instructional outcomes, and knowledge of resources Designing Student Assessments What is Component 1F? This component of Danielson's Framework involves creating assessments of learning and assessments for learning. Describe the goals of the lesson and how these goals relate to curriculum and standards. Higher order thinking activities 1f – *A variety of formative/summative assessments Designing student assessments 1e: Designing coherent instruction -Evaluator/ teacher conversations - Lesson/unit plan Observation Pre-observation form Learning targets Entry slips/exit slips Grouping of students Variety of activities - Variety of instructional strategies - Same learning target, differentiated pathways Possible Artifacts for Danielson Domains One and Four Educator Effectiveness Pilot Network April 2014 Note: Educators will provide artifacts as evidence for Domains 1 and 4. Domain 1: Planning and Preparation. This site is intended for teachers to use as a tool to organize their artifacts and evidence. Establishing a Culture for Learning c. Jamie B. Student choice. *Unit plans that exhibit. Evidence comes from two principal sources: direct observation and the examination of artifacts. edu) Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning; reflecting the teacher's knowledge of content and students in the class  Franklin Pierce Schools - Examples of Artifacts & Evidence by Criterion. 2b. Managing Classroom Procedures d. D. Designing Coherent Instruction f. Designing Student Assessments: Teacher designed assessments are authentic, with real-world application as appropriate 1e. • Lesson plans  The Framework for Teaching Charlotte Danielson. ➢ Learning activities. Distributed by . Designing Coherent Instruction Artifacts; Sharp El-1701c Calculator Instructions F; Polaroid 600 Camera Instructions Battery; Coleman Wrist Watch Instructions; Plant Emerald Green Arborvitae Instructions; Lego Instructions Kai Dragon; Manuel Dinstruction Lexcavatrice Bobcat 418; Asus P5q Xeon X5460 Instructions The process/product portfolio is used to show stages in the development of one particular project. (Appendix I). For Focused Evaluatees, a Student Growth Goal is the only common required artifact. Collecting Artifacts and Adding Evidence Snapshot Peninsula School District Collecting and Aligning Artifacts: 1. Module 6 – A Professional Portfolio – Looking at Artifacts Activity “Answer key” for artifacts Showing Students How: First page is a planning document, and addresses components 1d Knowledge of Resources (what materials and resources will you need?) and 1e Designing Coherent Instruction (for activities, use of materials, etc) Component 4a 1e: designing student assessments This Component focuses on the teacher’s ability to create and/or select assessments that are congruent with instructional goals, criteria, and standards and to plan for the use of formative and summative assessments of their students. Designing student assessments . Purposeful Instructional Groups 4. Variety of instructional activities and methods. Activities that represent high -level thinking and engage students and advance them through the content . Use of varied resources. To quote Cheryl Frazes Hill in “A Portfolio Model for Music Educators” in Music Educators Journal, Vol. cps. Managing student behavior . What is it? Component A of Domain 3 tackles teacher communication with students. Certified staff members are encouraged to share artifacts with their evaluators at post- observation NMTEACH Domain 1: Planning and Preparation . Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities - Overview Domain 4, together with Domain 1 - Planning and Preparation, represents the "behind the scenes" work associated with teaching. 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Assessments 2a Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 2b Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c Managing Classroom Procedures 2d Managing Student Behavior 2e Organizing Physical Space Domain 3: Instruction Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities 3a Communicating With Students The Blueprints for Teaching and Learning in the Arts provide teachers with a path to follow for developing curriculum in all arts disciplines, and provide benchmarks for what children should know, understand, and be able to do in dance, music, theater, and visual arts at critical junctures in their intellectual, physical, and emotional development. Designing Student Assessments Domain Two: Classroom Environment a. 1f. • SLG Mid-Year Form. Each aspect is necessary for both teachers and students to work cooperatively in the classroom. Danielson Possible Artifacts: -Unit Plans  Designing coherent instruction: 1e. 1e is the complete 1e. edu) Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning; reflecting the teacher's knowledge of content and students in the class  The Framework for Teaching Charlotte Danielson. g. • Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c. 1 (September 2008), pp. Enhancing professional practice a framework for teaching (2nd ed. 20130814. POTENTIAL ARTIFACTS INCLUDE: *List of Professional Development Experiences such as conferences, workshops, webinars that the teacher participated in. ➢ Instructional materials and resources. E. Establishing a culture for learning . S. . What is it? Why is it important? No matter how well teachers know their content, they will not be the best teachers that they can be if they do not know their students. It is about how assessments must be adapted for student needs and how assessments should further student learning. It’s the core competence of instructional planning. 61-72, “The portfolio used in education is an organized collection of artifacts (examples of works) documenting a person’s skill and growth in an educational program and a career. An observer cannot know the background of every situation and can't be aware of the particular challenges facing each individual student. When planning and preparing for each week’s lessons, list the types of things that you need to know about each student in Designing coherent instruction: 1e Unit planning is structured . Coherence (methods, materials, assessments all work together); 2. *List of reliable resources used to expand knowledge of the teacher's content area. The sample artifacts and evidence below are illustrative in nature and do not represent a comprehensive list. Reflective Portfolio. ○ The physical 1f Designing Student Assessments. Coherence (methods, materials, assessments all work together). Student choice 5. Participant Packet, Page 9. Please do not include artifacts that you have not created–such as duplicated worksheets, etc. Paul's professional art educator portfolio! Check out all there is to know about my life, work, and professional study. Instruction al Activities : Includes questioning techniques, grouping strategies, pedagogical approaches. Director of Admissions, Field Experience, and Licensure 1F: Designing Student Assessments As teachers, it is important that we know where our students are in regards to our lessons. e. It is important that teachers use their materials, methods, content, and standards in order to balance the lessons. Creating an environment of respect and rapport • 2c. These include demonstrate knowledge of content and pedagogy, demonstrating knowledge of the students, selecting instructional goals, demonstrating knowledge of resources, designing coherent. Formal (see above description) Informal (see above description) DOMAIN 1: PLANNING AND PREPARATION Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction ELEMENT LEVEL OF PERFORMANCE UNSATISFACTORY RELATIVE TO STANDARD DEVELOPING RELATIVE TO STANDARD PROFICIENT RELATIVE TO STANDARD EXCEEDS STANDARD Learning Activities Learning activities are not suitable to students or IFSP/IEP goals. These components are essential in the smooth functioning of the classroom that students and parents rarely see. Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning,  students with diverse learning needs), as well as information, artifacts, and tools for applying the Framework across Component 1c is closely connected with Component 1d: Designing Coherent Instruction, Component 1e: Designing Student. 21 Apr 2010 instructional outcomes, demonstrating knowledge of resources, designing coherent instruction, designing student assessment, and demonstrating knowledge of technology. Communication with students is essential because teachers must convey to students that learning is important and inform them of the purpose of the material they learn. Standard 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction. Sep 30, 2009 · Best survey site online! $1,500 a month thanks to you guys! Without a doubt the best paid surveys site online!I have made money from other survey sites but made double or triple with GoldOpinions. A. 1e – Designing Coherent Instruction (Standard 4) 1f – Designing Student Assessments (Standard 5) NOTE: Please refer to The Framework for Professional Practice (Danielson) as a supplemental resource. ‎ > ‎ 1e. *Educational Psychology Research Articles and Reviews. Teachers may use formative assessments at the beginning of a lesson to evaluate their students previous knowledge and to gauge how much time to spend instructing each topic. ! TESS Examples of ARTIFACTS! 3! Revised 12/17/2013 ! Domain 3: Instruction a. ✓ Instructional groups. Designing Student Assessments: Teacher designed assessments are authentic, with real-world application as appropriate Begin collecting artifacts Start now to gather artifacts that illustrate your best teaching practices. (1b – Knowledge of Students, 1c – Selecting Instructional Goals, 1e – Designing Coherent Instruction) 2. coherent and has a clear structure. CO: 6Classroom Observation; PC: Professional Conversation; A: Artifacts Developed by TLS, Inc. For example I would like the students to give me a reason why they chose the answer they did/be bale to make corrections to make statements true. Student. Why Assess Teacher Effectiveness? ▫ Quality Designing Coherent Instruction. It combines knowledge of content and pedagogy, knowledge of students, and setting objectives using state/national standards. Please explain the following instructional elements as they relate to the lesson to be observed: 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Assessments 2. • Plan that includes variety of instructional groupings and instructional materials. Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning, reflecting the teacher's knowledge of content and of the students in the class, the Designing. Coherence ( methods, materials, assessments all work together). Possible Artifacts for Danielson Domains One and Four Educator Effectiveness Pilot Network April 2014 Note: Educators will provide artifacts as evidence for Domains 1 and 4. Maintaining records relating to instruction let both students and teachers understand their progress in learning. Teachers’ duties go beyond the doors of their classrooms and include activities related to the school or district. " Gather data for student growth and artifacts for professional practice. Designing Coherent Instruction ­­pacing guide (building blocksCourse calendars -­­ chunks) Unit outlines Lesson plans connected to standards ­­ to, with, byGradual release of responsibility - Assessments Lists of flexible learning groups Differentiated lessons Collaborative learning activities for students 1e Designing Coherent Instruction Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning, reflecting the teacher’s knowledge of content and the students in the class, the intended outcomes of instruction, and the available resources. Evidence for rating these domains is gathered through artifacts and professional conversations. This component reminds teachers of the importance of having a knowledge of all components of the Danielson Framework because it exists as a means to help us be better educators. • Some possible artifacts are teacher-created observation. If there is a guest speaker, include the presenter’s name and affiliation. Ed. Managing Student Behavior e. Teacher ePortfolio Model. The components of Domain 1: Planning, Preparation, and Assessment are crucial to any teacher’s success. Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Artifacts  3 Mar 2014 In most cases, the term refers to the alignment of learning standards and teaching —i. Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport. Assessment(s) to be used in the unit plan including a table/matrix showing how your objectives are matched to the test items and/or the performance assessment requirements. Instructional planning must show a structure. They do not follow an organized 1e. This means taking the Common Core State Curriculum and interpreting the objectives so that all students can be successful in mastering them. Setting Instructional Outcomes--Pre  1e Designing Coherent Instruction. ▫ Unit plans that exhibit. There needs to be coherence between the outcomes, activities, materials, methods and assessments for lesson success. Designing Coherent Instruction: Activities permit student choice 1e. 1e: Designing coherent instruction • questioning (level of questioning based on student need) Criterion 5: Fostering and managing a safe, positive learning environment : 2a: Creating an environment of respect and rapport • behavior contract • evidence gathered from observation by evaluator • notes home 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction. Domain 1, Planning, Preparation and Assessment, is a domain that encompasses demonstrating knowledge of content and pedagogy, demonstrating knowledge of students, selecting instructional goals and objectives, demonstrating knowledge of resources for teaching and for students’ use, designing coherent instruction, and assessing student learning. 1ff:: Asssseesssiinngg eSSt tuuddennt Leeaarrnniinngg Teacher’s approach to assessing student learning contains no clear criteria or standards, and lacks congruence with the instructional goals. See pages 102-106 for goal form. This framework is This framework is designed to support student achievement and professional best-practice through the domains of Planning and Preparation, Classroom Environment, Instruction Resources (readings, artifacts, internet sites, videos, etc): Provide the title, author, edition, publisher, cost, and where it is available. Not only on simply instruction, but on designing flowing, understandable instruction. Instructional Materials, Technology, and Resources 3. In order to do this, we must be knowledgeable of the state standards, curricular standards, and how they progress and build upon each other. • Managing Student Behavior 2e. A written observation report or Mini Observation and Artifact Evidence Documentation Form will be Documentation of evidence and artifacts shall occur on the evidence document form. Unit Organizers (that exhibit1. Reflecting on teaching. Just as there are varying levels of performance in instruction, there are varying performance levels to be demonstrated with artifacts. A writing portfolio, for instance, might include initial ideas for a piece, background research or short sketches, multiple rough drafts with comments and changes, and a final draft. Assessment procedures are not congruent with instructional outcomes and contain no criteria by which forms of artifacts of learning (e. Possible artifacts for Component 1D are lesson plans that show use of technology, websites that demonstrate resources, articles written by professionals, etc. 5. - Example Assessments. 1D Demonstrating knowledge of resources. Higher order  e. Each domain details projects, artifacts, and evidence of Designing Student Assessment Component 1F involves designing and using assessment that works to improve learning for all students through adaption and modification as indicated by student needs. Reflecting on Teaching b. Opportunities for student choice. New Special Education Teacher Training Day 1 – August 21-22 2012-2013 (PRINTED July 27, 2012) BEO 5: Designing coherent instruction Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning, reflecting the teacher’s knowledge of content and the students in the class, the intended outcomes of instruction, and the available resources. - Pacing Guides/Instructional Maps. • Understands the instructional significance of varied student learning needs and preferences. LANNING AND . 2c . In this subsection, that complements Component 1C perfectly, the Danielson Model challenges students and teachers to understand state required content at a deeper level and build upon the skills previously acquired. Instructional maps that indicate relationships to prior learning. Nov 18, 2015 · A presentation by Katelyn Hansen created with Haiku Deck, free presentation software that is simple, beautiful, and fun. 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Graphic organizer of important concepts and how they relate to one another as well as other disciplines Step‐by‐step sequence of pre‐requisite relationships among 1e Designing Coherent Instruction • Lessons that support instructionaloutcomes and reflect important concepts • Instructional maps that indicaterelationships prior learning • Activities that represent high-level thinking • Opportunities for student choice • Use of varied resources • Thoughtfully planned learning groups A professional community is characterized by mutual support, respect, and by recognition of the responsibility of teachers to be seeking ways to improve their practice and contribute to the school. - Modification Plans. Keeping non-instructional records pertains to the importance of recording important information students turn in. ). 1f Designing Danielson Instructional Framework Observation-Evidence-Artifacts-Documentation Form. Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction A significant positive attribute of the way the Social Studies curriculum is designed relates to both its structure and feasibility for customization and engagement. A teacher translates instructional outcomes into learning experiences for students by their design of instruction. Designing coherent instruction is important in order to advance and challenge students at appropriate levels. • SLG Goal Setting Form. 1f Designing documents their growth as professionals during their capstone student teaching experience. Each lesson provides and discusses the relating vocabulary words and sequential historical events/people. (1b – Knowledge of Students, 1c – Selecting Instructional Goals, 1e – Designing Coherent Instruction) 3. Danielson, C. Evaluation Forms. • Organizing Physical Space DOMAIN 3 • INSTRUCTION 3a. The Framework for Teaching organizes the multiple measures that comprised Kentucky's previous Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. An effective educator will dedicate the appropriate amount of time and resources before each lesson to prepare and ensure that all materials are ready, and that they are mentally Artifacts for Component 4C: Some artifacts for Component 4C include, a weekly/monthly class newsletter, proof of meetings, phone calls, or emails to family members from the teacher, or a class website. • Designing Student Assessments DOMAIN 2 • THE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT 2a. Evidence for Domains 2 and 3 will be collected 1e – Designing coherent instruction • Learning activities • Instructional materials and resources • Instructional groups • Lesson and unit structure • Unit plans that exhibit 1) Coherence (methods, materials, assessments all work together) 2) Variety of instructional activities and methods 3) Problem based learning 4) Student choice Students should also be able to choose HOW to show what they know by means of Differentiated Instruction. • Use of resources related to standards. designing student assessment Artifacts include kahoot, quizlet, rubrics, and questioning during the lesson or at the end of the Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities. Meaningful/respectful tasks. Perceptive reflection on teaching and learning and use of such in future instruction planning Massachusetts Model System for Educator Evaluation CLASSROOM TEACHER RUBRIC August 2018 75 Pleasant Street, Malden, MA02148-4906 Phone 781-338-3000 TTY: N. ✓ Instructional materials and resources. ▫ Teacher artifacts . - Rubrics. Throughout the year the teacher and evaluator will contribute evidence and artifacts to. Assessing student learning; Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Domain 2 (The Classroom Environment) addresses the teacher's skill in establishing an environment conducive to learning, including both the physical and interpersonal aspects of the environment. Lesson and Unit Structure e. Generic—applies to all teaching situations, grade levels, content areas. Competency 003 The teacher understands procedures for designing effective and coherent instruction 1e Designing Coherent Instruction • Learning activities • Instructional materials and resources • Instructional groups • Lesson and unit structure 1f Designing Student Assessments • Congruence with outcomes • Criteria and standards • Formative assessments • Use for planning Communicating with Students Component 3A is all about the significance of communicating with students. Domain 1- Planning and Preparation and Domain 4- Professional Responsibilities . Domain 1 focuses on the knowledge teachers have of their subjects’ content and pedagogy, teachers teaching content to the students, everything teachers teach has a purpose, designing coherent instruction how important it is planning, teacher’s using resources to enhance student learning, reflecting teacher’s knowledge of content and Pair and Share 1. Assessing student learning. Lesson/unit plans. Teachers should use artifacts that are reflective of their own work. *List of educational Twitter chats. Component 1E is all about designing "coherent" instruction. Critical Attributes: Learning activities are matched to instructional outcomes. Variety of  1e – Designing coherent instruction. Instructional artifacts (evidence in the form of student work products with comments) Resources to assist teaching and/or help students, i. Youmaychoosetousetheseideasand/o r supplement with artifacts relative to your practice. words, how the teacher designs instruction. To create coherent practice, the teacher intentionally brings components together with a focus on student learning. Communicating 1f: designing student assessments. ▫ Teacher artifacts  The teacher education programs at IUP have been developed based upon our belief that teaching, learning, and communicating of Students; Selecting Instructional Outcomes; Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources; Designing Coherent Instruction; Developing Student Assessments In addition, you will compile an electronic portfolio and will select artifacts to address each of the InTASC Standards. Clearly recognizable structure. 1f . Concept Map – Advanced Organizer Meaningful/respectful tasks 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction 1f: Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures 2d: Managing Student Behavior 2e: Organizing Physical Space observations, insights, class notes, and other artifacts. Designing Coherent Instruction Lesson plans show progression of complexity Curriculum Mapping Teacher & student reflection of lessons, learning, or feedback (written or oral). • Learning activities are designed to engage students and advance them through the content. See pages 52-56 for list of possible artifacts. • Assessing evaluates student performance to design instruction appropriate for social, cognitive, and  26 Aug 2019 Observation Worksheet & Pre-Observation. Designing Coherent Instruction What is Component 1E? This component of Danielson's Framework involves reflecting the teacher's knowledge of content, their students, the intended outcomes, and the available resources when designing instruction. N/A The series of learning experiences is poorly aligned with the instructional outcomes and does not represent a coherent structure. What evidence or artifacts are still needed? Questions for my PLC. Observation is Artifacts offer the best, and in some cases the only, evidence of certain aspects of teaching. Relay 800-439-2370 Definition & Explanation of Artifacts/Menu: Artifacts are “things” that document the work that teachers/administrators do “off stage” in preparation for and in reflection upon their work with students/educators. A coherent science curriculum should build ideas across time and disciplines by connecting ideas between relevant topics and by aligning the development of instructional materials, instruction, and assessment. Some of your artifacts should indicate how you adapt instruction for diverse learners. ○ Assessment in  1e Designing coherent instruction. Designing coherent instruction requires that teachers utilize each of the components in Danielson's framework in order to align the content in a comprehensive way for students to understand. Designing coherent instruction Learning activities asked to collect evidence and artifacts to support their ratings on the self-assessment and (Designing(Coherent(Instruction Artifact Ideas - DDSD 13-14 Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction Designing coherent instruction is the heart of planning, reflecting the teacher’s knowledge of content and of the students in the class, the intended outcomes of instruction, and the available resources. , how well and to what Schools and districts have also embraced more coherent approaches to the design and delivery of learning  Danielson 2013 Rubric—Adapted to New York Department of Education Framework for Teaching Components. 1b: designing coherent instruction The teacher plans learning activities that align with instructional goals and support student learning. 4. A reflective portfolio is used to document Danielson/ELL Crosswalk Introduction: This document uses the Danielson framework to examine what both effective and highly effective English Language Learner (ELL) instruction looks like. Component 1e: Designing coherent instruction rationale and explanation (excerpt from "Enhancing Professional Practice") This rationale and explanation of Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction comes from Charlotte Danielson's Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching 2nd Edition (Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2007), pages 55-59. 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Assessments According to the Idaho State Department of Education, Danielson's Domain #1 aligns with the Idaho Core Teaching Standards #1 (Knowledge of Subject Matter) #2 (Knowledge of Human Development and Learning), #7 (Instructional Planning Skills. •Designing Coherent Instruction. ✓ Lesson and unit structure. Planning and preparation play a critical role in effective instruction and the facilitation of engaging learning experiences that promote higher-order thinking. 1e – Designing coherent instruction Learning activities Instructional materials and resources Instructional groups Lesson and unit structure Unit plans that exhibit 1. Standards-Based Learning Activities 2. - Grouping Matrix f. ” 1f: Designing Student Assessments Component 1f deals with teachers creating assessments that properly test the students to the best of their abilities. Through their skills in Domain 4, teachers demonstrate their commitment to high ethical and professional standards and seek to improve their practice. Students are to pick a pumpkin, say the name and it's sound(s), and then find the upper- and lower-case words to trace them. Domain 1: Planning and Preparation, Competency e: Designing Coherent Instruction. However, if I were to redo the GoFormative site I would allow for True/False to be expanded on. The activities are not designed to engage students in active intellectual activity and have unrealistic time allocations. To be successful, teachers Validity Research on Teacher Evaluation Systems Based on the Framework for Teaching After decades of disinterest, eval uation of the performance of elementary and secondary teachers in the United States has become a important educational policy issue. Structured lesson plans Component 1e pertains to the importance of creating coherent instruction. Designing coherent instruction requires knowledge of content, students, resources, and pedagogy. Instructional maps that indicate relationships to prior learning . Using the artifact guide, teacher gathers and uploads the required artifact on eVal. 6. The outcomes also reflect multiple other things such as resources or tools used as well as methods of teaching. Domain 1 is often viewed as the groundwork of preparing and organizing for classroom instruction. Logical sequence. • Creating an Environment of Respect And Rapport 2b. NMTEACH 1B: Designing Coherent Instruction • To what level are activities meaningfully sequenced to support learning? • To what level are a variety of learning strategies and individual supports used within the instructional plan? Note content areas (Duschl, Schweingruber & Shouse, 2007). • Managing Classroom Procedures 2d. Component 1E of the Danielson Framework is Designing Coherent Instruction. • By April 11, you may submit up to eight artifacts that should be tangible evidence of components within Domains 1 and 4 of the Danielson framework. Instruction needs to advance and challenge students in their ZPD for them to learn, but it needs to be understandable and within their abilities. Instructional groups do not support the 1e. Unit planning is structured. Designing Student Assessments Domain 2 THE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT a. 1e Designing Coherent Instruction • Learning activities • Instructional materials and resources • Instructional groups • Lesson and unit structure 1f Designing Student Assessments • Congruence with outcomes • Criteria and standards • Formative assessments • Use for planning Domain 2: The Classroom Environment 1e: Designing coherent instruction Observable Classroom Practice the teacher at providing some variety. Pre-Observation conference. Artifacts There should be no fewer than 2 and no more than 5 artifacts per domain. Looking to other teacher's lesson plans and ideas after you have taught your own in order to better improve your lesson. In "Drafting & Design", the computer program SolidWorks was utilized to create three dimensional objects in the digital realm. Understanding 1e. A well-designed instruction plan that meets the needs of all students is necessary for the growth of a classroom as a whole. Designing Coherent Instruction Lesson Plans show progression of continuity Curriculum Mapping Teacher and student reflection of lessons, learning, or feedback (written or oral) Student developed rubric tied to specific goals Concept Maps, Graphic Organizers Meaningful/respectful Tasks 1f. Designing Coherent Instruction Brief, digital video lesson with narration delivers content in an engaging, multimedia format to suit the needs of both visual and auditory learners Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy 1e. Setting instructional outcomes helps guide the teacher and students to the path of what they will learn, not the activities they complete. 1f Designing Student Assessments 1g Using Support Personnel PLANNING AND PREPARATION 1a Demonstrating Knowledge of Content, Pedagogy, and Evidence-Based Practices 1b Demonstrating Knowledge of Adult Learners 1c Setting Appropriate Instructional Outcomes 1d Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources 1e Designing Coherent Instruction Designing coherent instruction . designing coherent instruction artifacts

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